Blogs

Home / Blogs

Strategies for Upgrading Your PLC5 Hardware

The programmable logic controller, or PLC, has been around forever by high tech standards. The original PLCs came out in the late 1960s, and the venerable PLC 5 has been doing admirable service since its introduction in 1988. Time and technology have caught up with the PLC 5, however, and the product is no longer manufactured. Indeed, Rockwell/Allen-Bradley now recommends replacing your aging PLC 5 hardware with ControlLogix (CLX) control systems.
read more…

In Memoriam and Appreciation: Jerry Zeigenfuse

Jerry Zeigenfuse passed away peacefully this week.
read more…

What’s Lurking in Your Enclosures?

Let me know if this sounds familiar to you: somewhere in the plant there’s an enclosure that houses your controls hardware. It’s seen some changes over time – some components may have been replaced or may no longer be needed, but no one seems to know if there’s been any documentation of the changes: the old napkin on which someone drew a schematic disappeared long ago. And there may not be any documentation at all for the wiring connections to your field or internal devices.
read more…

‘Twas the night before Shutdown

‘Twas the night before Shutdown: I tell you, my dears,
All of Avanceon was stirring – (they are engineers)
Their stockings were snug in their shoes on their feet,
As there was a new project deadline to meet.
Not one thought of sugarplums — No, quite instead
Strange visions of programs danced in their heads.
The team was all nestled quite snug in their code
All wanted to finish and get on the road….
While Tracey was focused on the perfect MES
And Scott was pushing for one more pre-test,
With Matt stuck in meetings, and Brian with SCADA
We all saw our Holidays getting consumed by the data.
read more…

Of Symphonic Musicians, Tennis Champions, and Skill Building

In his book Outliers, Malcolm Gladwell explores the habits and routines common among people in different fields who have achieved significant success. As part of his discussion, Gladwell cites the “10,000 hour rule,” which notices that many of the elite musicians in major symphony orchestras spend at least 10,000 practicing before becoming professionals. In subsequent interviews, Gladwell explains he mentioned the “rule” to show not only the effort required by the musicians themselves, but also the large amount of sacrifice and assistance needed by those around them. However, many people took the “rule” to mean that practicing something for 10,000 hours guaranteed proficiency and success.
read more…